Friends become enemies

Solomon Mogilevsky brought Stan Harding to the same guesthouse where Marguerite Harrison was staying. What transpired next later became an international scandal that would always cast a shadow over Harrison’s career as an intelligence officer. Marguerite later contended that she tried to warn Harding not to come into Russia and that once the British woman …

Harrison accompanies Bertrand Russell into the heartland

In early June, a delegation from Great Britain, including philosopher and writer Bertrand Russell, arrived in Moscow to gather information that might lead to resumption of trade between England and Russia. Mogilevsky told Marguerite she would be with them to keep watch over the delegates. She readily agreed to go, hoping to slip information to …

Recreation al fresco

Despite Mogilevsky’s spies, Marguerite managed to take a weekend sojourn from Moscow to a country dacha with Samuel Hopwood, formerly a manager of the Kodak Company, and his daughters. They stayed with a peasant woman, a widow whose son had been killed in the war, near the Moscow River. Marguerite later recalled that they arrived …

Seeing double: Harrison pressed into service for the Reds

Marguerite Harrison had fallen for an old ploy. She naively had thought that she had won the Bolsheviks’ trust by pretending to be a journalist sympathetic to their cause. Instead, they had allowed her access to incriminating information and forced her to acknowledge she was a spy. Mogilevsky was in charge of recruiting international agents …

Women of the world unite!

Throughout late February and early March 1920, Marguerite Harrison interviewed numerous Soviet officials, including some powerful women. Today is International Women's Day, so it's fitting to acknowledge these female revolutionaries. Among those was Angelica Balabanova, the secretary of the Third International, the organization of Communists from around the world. Balabanova and Harrison had much in …