Stan Harding accuses Harrison of betrayal

While Marguerite Harrison was in Asia, British journalist Stan Harding began a public campaign for justice. She gave interview to British newspapers accusing Marguerite of betraying her to the Bolshevik authorities. She blamed not only Cheka, but Marguerite and the American intelligence services for the suffering she had endured in Soviet prisons and she demanded …

American aid officials reluctant to help

Marguerite faced three charges—the old espionage charge, entering the country illegally, and a new spying charge. She was completely cut off from the outside world. Unlike the first imprisonment, when she received aid packages, this time she heard no news, received no letters. Her relatives struggled to persuade U.S. officials to fight for her freedom …

Return to Moscow

Marguerite Harrison arrived in Moscow on Sunday, December 3, 1922. She was amazed at how much the city had changed since she had last seen it sixteen months earlier. Foreign aid and Lenin’s New Economic Policy, which relaxed some of the more draconian measures of state communism, had made life better. Tramlines were operating, and …