Harrison gathers intelligence for Chinese warlord

After a week in Vladivostok, Marguerite Harrison set out again, this time headed for China. She traveled by a coastal steamer to Korea, where she observed a nascent nationalist movement brewing in opposition to the Japanese rule and glimpsed the work of American missionaries trying to convert the natives to Christianity. Later arriving in Mukden, …

Military chief warns of “extreme caution”

In Vladivostok, Marguerite reunited with Major Faymonville, the military observer, and Edward Thomas, the Chita vice consul, who were anxious to hear about her experiences on the Amur River. American military attaches were keeping watch over the turbulent region, which promised vast business potential despite political instability. The agents asked her to write about her …

Marguerite Harrison: A woman of suspicion

Once she settled in New York, she soon accepted several speaking engagements that took her to lecture halls throughout the Northeast and Midwest. During these appearances, Marguerite carefully avoided mention of her intelligence work. Once, when a woman in the audience asked about rumors that Marguerite had been a double agent, she replied coyly: “Don’t …

Marguerite finds it difficult to go home again

Marguerite found it difficult to adjust to life back in Baltimore. Baltimore Sun Editor Frank Kent offered her her old job back at the newspaper, and she accepted, hoping to rediscover the pleasure she once had covering Baltimore’s music and theater scene. But as the weeks passed, Marguerite felt increasingly alienated from those people and …