Marguerite Harrison: A woman of suspicion

Once she settled in New York, she soon accepted several speaking engagements that took her to lecture halls throughout the Northeast and Midwest. During these appearances, Marguerite carefully avoided mention of her intelligence work. Once, when a woman in the audience asked about rumors that Marguerite had been a double agent, she replied coyly: “Don’t …

Marguerite finds it difficult to go home again

Marguerite found it difficult to adjust to life back in Baltimore. Baltimore Sun Editor Frank Kent offered her her old job back at the newspaper, and she accepted, hoping to rediscover the pleasure she once had covering Baltimore’s music and theater scene. But as the weeks passed, Marguerite felt increasingly alienated from those people and …

MID officials raise doubts about Marguerite

Appearing before newspaper reporters in Riga and Berlin, Marguerite presented an image of a woman who had been inadvertently caught up in an international scandal. She made no mention of being an intelligence agent, but told reporters she had been arrested for entering the Russia illegally, for supplying British and American prisoners with unauthorized aid, …

Struggling to stay alive

Having apparently appeased Cheka, Marguerite Harrison was released from solitary confinement and placed in a cell with a dozen other women who faced political charges. These inmates included a young peasant girl who was overheard speaking about a new revolution, wives and girlfriends of White Russian Army officers, and aristocrats who had supported the czar. …